1 June 2014

a leafy pause


L I F E & T R A V E L || England

When life gets hectic sometimes it's good to stop, step back and re-prioritise. A couple of weekends ago, I went to visit my gran. I love London, and always will I think, but stepping out of the big smoke can be a welcome break. A lot is going on at the moment so it was good to just see my dad, gran and spend time helping the family out.

One of my favourite things about my grandparents' house is the garden. Gran has spent a lot of time working on it and you can tell. It's filled with so many different types of plants and gives off a very relaxed vibe. I love flowers, currently I buy them but one day I hope to have a little garden of my own. For now, this one can be my imaginary benchmark and I will continue to admire it in all its glory.

I hope you've all had a chill weekend and enjoyed the glorious sunshine. Happy June!


P.S. I'm sorry about my flower / plant knowledge game, it's pretty weak. If you know the names of any of these beauties, do let me know please! ]


I will now leave you with probably one of the most insightful throwbacks I have had yet. Whilst helping gran go through some of her things, we came across her collection of Home Chat magazines [one of the bestselling women's magazines of the 1900s]. This particular edition is from February 8th 1941 and includes classic wartime housewife topics such as "Transfer Designs for your Lampshades" and "So, You're Meeting His People" - advice for when you're meeting your future family in law. It was like a window into my gran's life at that time: maintaining a happy home, keeping busy during war time and focusing on the positives at such a difficult time. She remembered the magazine fondly and still wants to try out the lampshade designs [it's probably come back into trend now anyway]. I guess Home Chat still resonates with her after all this time. As interesting as I found flipping through the articles and [amusing] adverts, I couldn't help but admire the actual artwork - it is a great example of graphic design at its best.

For more insight, check out: The Way Women Were: 60 Years Ago via Stylist Magazine

Home Chat doesn't have a website. If you'd like your own copy you can now buy them over at Etsy under "vintage 1950s womens magazines" - example here.